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The Bayou Gardener Family

Rajun Gardener

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Rajun Gardener last won the day on March 28

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About Rajun Gardener

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    Dirt Dabber
  • Birthday 07/02/1965

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    Lafayette La

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  1. Right click on the video while it's playing and a black box will pop up and allow you to copy the url.
  2. Here's a good video walking you through it, I've made this a few times but added more red pepper and green onions.
  3. I've got a few recipes I swiped from Facebook.
  4. Well, he's an idiot. What kind of advise is that? More Heirloom tomatoes have been around for decades than hybrids. If hybrids were so perfect then why are all the seed companies still investing in developing new hybrids. You know what they use to breed hybrids? Heirlooms!!!!
  5. My 2 cents is it's the soil. The whole plant is suffering from malnutrition. Either get a new bag of MG potting soil or grab some Hydro juice from your Dad and feed that thing, I bet it takes off. I almost lost all my seedlings this year to the same thing, once I transplanted they took off. Make sure you get a bag of soil that's dry, I use MG Moisture control in the blue bag and have had great results.
  6. I'm gonna make a batch of Loquat too. That clear wine I posted earlier is persimmon and it's very good and taste nothing like persimmon. Marcello's on Johnston carries all the brewing supplies you need.
  7. I've got bottles of wine sitting waiting to get used up. I made a grocery store marked down fruit batch last year and it came out better than I thought. I have a pure 3 gallon batch of blackberry I started in September that I'm waiting a full year to age.
  8. I thought I posted this last night. It's in good shape and won't take much to get it back in shape, nice pot! If it's just rust I would soak it in a 50/50 vinegar/water solution till it cleans up, soak it for a while then scrub with steelwool till it washes off without a rust color. It might take a few hours soaking to a day and you'll know when all the rust is gone when you rinse it off. Make sure once it's clean and rinsed good to dry it with heat and as soon as it's dry put a coat of oil on it. I think I would use a crawfish/fish fry burner set on low heat and also use a weed burner set on low to dry the top part and also to season it. If it has crud on it and you want it cleaned, use a large garbage bag to wrap it up in after you spray it down with oven cleaner. Wear gloves and a mask, those fumes can be bad. Make sure you rinse it good if you use oven cleaner then use the same thing as above to dry and season it. Seasoning goes fast on a crawfish burner, you'll know the seasoning is working when you see the oil smoking then stop. Be careful seasoning that big pot, you don't want to crank up the heat all at once. Let it get hot slowly to the smoking point then rotate the pot so it heats evenly. I hope that makes sense
  9. Yes!! This is so true!! Millennials and Zoomers are so friggin entitled. Gen X is the last generation to understand what the greatest generation and previous generations went through. We failed society with our impertinent, bratty kids. Here's a post going around Facebook. I talked to a man today I talked with a man today, an 80+ year old man. I asked him if there was anything I can get him while this Coronavirus scare was gripping America. He simply smiled, looked away and said: "Let me tell you what I need! I need to believe, at some point, this country my generation fought for... I need to believe this nation we handed safely to our children and their children... I need to know this generation will quit being a bunch of sissies...that they respect what they've been given...that they've earned what others sacrificed for." I wasn't sure where the conversation was going or if it was going anywhere at all. So, I sat there, quietly observing. "You know, I was a little boy during WWII. Those were scary days. We didn't know if we were going to be speaking English, German or Japanese at the end of the war. There was no certainty, no guarantees like Americans enjoy today. And no home went without sacrifice or loss. Every house, up and down every street, had someone in harm's way. Maybe their Daddy was a soldier, maybe their son was a sailor, maybe it was an uncle. Sometimes it was the whole damn family...fathers, sons, uncles... Having someone, you love, sent off to war...it wasn't less frightening than it is today. It was scary as Hell. If anything, it was more frightening. We didn't have battle front news. We didn't have email or cellphones. You sent them away and you hoped...you prayed. You may not hear from them for months, if ever. Sometimes a mother was getting her son's letters the same day Dad was comforting her over their child's death. And we sacrificed. You couldn't buy things. Everything was rationed. You were only allowed so much milk per month, only so much bread, toilet paper. EVERYTHING was restricted for the war effort. And what you weren't using, what you didn't need, things you threw away, they were saved and sorted for the war effort. My generation was the original recycling movement in America. And we had viruses back then...serious viruses. Things like polio, measles, and such. It was nothing to walk to school and pass a house or two that was quarantined. We didn't shut down our schools. We didn't shut down our cities. We carried on, without masks, without hand sanitizer. And do you know what? We persevered. We overcame. We didn't attack our President, we came together. We rallied around the flag for the war. Thick or thin, we were in it to win. And we would lose more boys in an hour of combat than we lose in entire wars today." He slowly looked away again. Maybe I saw a small tear in the corner of his eye. Then he continued: "Today's kids don't know sacrifice. They think a sacrifice is not having coverage on their phone while they freely drive across the country. Today's kids are selfish and spoiled. In my generation, we looked out for our elders. We helped out with single moms whose husbands were either at war or dead from war. Today's kids rush the store, buying everything they can...no concern for anyone but themselves. It's shameful the way Americans behave these days. None of them deserve the sacrifices their granddads made. So, no I don't need anything. I appreciate your offer but, I know I've been through worse things than this virus. But maybe I should be asking you, what can I do to help you? Do you have enough pop to get through this, enough steak? Will you be able to survive with 113 channels on your tv?" I smiled, fighting back a tear of my own...now humbled by a man in his 80's. All I could do was thank him for the history lesson, leave my number for emergency and leave with my ego firmly tucked in my rear. I talked to a man today. A real man. An American man from an era long gone and forgotten. We will never understand the sacrifices. We will never fully earn their sacrifices. But we should work harder to learn about them..learn from them...to respect them.
  10. Roses, loquats, orange trees and kumquats for your viewing pleasure!!!!
  11. RIP Ben, Prayers for the family including the BG family. We've lost a lot of good people over the years.
  12. You mean something like this?
  13. Wait, I have more good news. https://www.fiercepharma.com/vaccines/china-s-cansino-pushes-coronavirus-vaccine-into-clinical-testing-as-moderna-doses-1st https://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotech/pfizer-biontech-strike-covid-19-deal-commit-multiple-r-d-sites-to-vaccine-development
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