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ol hippie

Growing peppers from seed

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Around here if you growing tomatoes or peppers, it’s going to be Bonnie plants. I’d like to try some different varieties of peppers and only way is from seed. I’m only talking about maybe a half dozen or so. My main question is, can I plant the seed directly in container or ground and not have to start inside or under heat lamps, etc. 

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Yes it can be done. The reason for starting them inside under a heat lamp or light is to get a jump-start on the growing season. Planting them directly into the ground you have to make sure that they are protected from any late Frost. You may being late in the season with the tomato plants and the heat might shut down pollination before you have a decent crop. 

An alternative is to plant them in a hoop house or a Cold frame. A Cold frame can be built with an old window sash built over a frame on the ground facing south. I had one at one time built with an old storm door that had solid glass.

Google cold frames and you will see pictures of them I cannot figure out how to get a picture on this post from the internet with my phone.

Got it.

 

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Edited by bigboberta
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Bob Guidry

Retired Fire Fighter

Easleyville, LA

 

 

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2 hours ago, ol hippie said:

Around here if you growing tomatoes or peppers, it’s going to be Bonnie plants. I’d like to try some different varieties of peppers and only way is from seed. I’m only talking about maybe a half dozen or so. My main question is, can I plant the seed directly in container or ground and not have to start inside or under heat lamps, etc. 

You should start almost everything inside first if it is possible. It gives the plants time to get going without being out in the weather. I have to do that with peppers and tomatoes since in July the temperature can be 98 in the day and 42 at night. Not much growing at those temps.

Buying started plants is really not worth the money if you can start from seed.


Disclaimer: All photographs uploaded here were taken for my own use. You do not see any weeds. It is you imagination.

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 I use my DIY seed starting rack with  a seedling heat mat and high dome lid on my trays,

i-XDvVPN9.jpg

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Once they all  germinate I turn the grow lights on.

When they get their first set of real leaves I remove the cover and give them a diluted solution of Miracle Grow. It is the one and only time I use MG but I find it helps build a strong root system for the little seedlings and lower the lights to about 2" above the leaves.

 

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When they out grow the starter tray I transplant them into 12 ounce Solo cup until I can plant them in the ground.

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Be very patient I find that peppers take a long time to germinate so I start mine  early February.for transplanting into the High Tunnel in late April -early May.

 

 

Edited by Maggie13
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21' X 48' High Tunnel

Knox, NY

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I agree with the above post in that starting them indoors will give you the head start you'll need. Make sure you harden them off for a week or two prior to planting them in your garden. Start by giving them a few hours outside and gradually increase that time. Try to keep them in less direct sunlight at first. Best of luck to you. 

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That's what I do also but I do not have a greenhouse therefore they go into the ground as soon as possible. I found my  peppers take on average 18 days to germinate. I need tp o find some of the high dome tops! Didn't know they made them!

Wade

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I get a lot of my greenhouse supplies from greenhousemegastore.com.

They are reasonable on  seed starting items, but sometimes you have to buy quantities to get good prices. Better if you can find them locally.

Here is the large domes.

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Disclaimer: All photographs uploaded here were taken for my own use. You do not see any weeds. It is you imagination.

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Thanks for the link Big, but I'd say that's a little pricey!

Wade

 

BTW, I got a friend in Missoula. 

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57 minutes ago, 1shotwade said:

Thanks for the link Big, but I'd say that's a little pricey!

Wade

 

BTW, I got a friend in Missoula. 

You have to shop around. I have a fairly extensive list that I buy from. It is frustrating sometimes when I need 5 different things, and to get a decent price I have to order each item from a different place.

Sorry not a Griz fan. My kids are all Bobcats!

Missoula is a nice town. Too much traffic.


Disclaimer: All photographs uploaded here were taken for my own use. You do not see any weeds. It is you imagination.

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Instead of domes, you can stack your trays and will keep some humidity and the soil wet where the top tray sets on the soil of the bottom tray.  Just unstack them once the seeds start geminating.

Domes do cost some money but they have helped with my germination.  I don't have to worry about the soil drying out due to low humidity during germination.  

Edited by Jimmiec
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22 minutes ago, Jimmiec said:

Instead of domes, you can stack your trays and will keep some humidity and the soil wet where the top tray sets on the soil of the bottom tray.  Just unstack them once the seeds start geminating.

Domes do cost some money but they have helped with my germination.  I don't have to worry about the soil drying out due to low humidity during germination.  

I also remove the domes right after the first true leaves start to form. Helps with damping off. If you plant in succession or have different start dates for your seeds, you can switch the domes around and not need as many.

I have been know to use saran wrap on pepper trays since they have a considerably longer germination rate. Once they sprout, put a dome on them. I usually only use the short domes for the reason stated above.


Disclaimer: All photographs uploaded here were taken for my own use. You do not see any weeds. It is you imagination.

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I think my biggest problem would be not having a heated place to do this. I can’t do it in the house and neither my storage shed or shop is heated. I been researching start up kits and cold frames. It may be over my head for no more than a dozen or so plants. Here’s a picture of just one startup kit of many I looked at last couple nights. 
 

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well, to be honest, i like to plant my seeds outside after easter.  i don't like to have to harden stuff off and take in and out.  i start them in small containers on my table outside and then transplant them when they get big enough.  it is true, they take a good while to grow, but i find that they grow fast over the summer and then set fruit in the fall when the weather breaks.  a few years ago i even dug up one of my pepper plants and over wintered it inside.  then replanted after the frost.  i cut off the plastic pot it was in, set the whole thing dirt and all in the hole, filled in the rest and watered.  a big head start to flowers!

 2 winters ago my husband made me a table top little green house thing out of scrap lumber.  it was made to fit the glass top table i have my plants on and was about 2 feet tall.  i just covered it in some roll plastic i had in the well house.  worked fine.  it actually got really warm in there when the sun was up.  the heavier ceramic planters i had some of my plants in let the heat out at night.  worked fine.  i will have to see if i can find a pic of it.

 

 

 

 

 

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Just my 2 cents.  I can get tomatoes to come up fine under fluorescent lights in my unheated shop, but I have had very poor luck with peppers.  I think the heat mat is pretty much a necessity for them.  I'll be getting one before planting time this year.  It'll pay for itself in a year or two of not having to buy started plants. 

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Mammoth Jalapenos (because I like poppers)

Hot Wax Peppers (cause they hold up really well as pickled peppers)

Giant Marconi (because I suck at growing bell peppers, these make a ton and have a really good flavor, no heat at all)

Edited by Boudin
typo

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I grow a multitude of different peppers. Been trying to find out which are the best around here. I grown in soil in containers in my greenhouse, hydroponically in the greenhouse, and outside in the soil in rows.

California Wonder bells are the best for a regular bell pepper. Had 55 Serrano chili plants this year, and 65 jalapeno plants. they all did fantastic. Had 3 Santaka chili  plants that turned out really good also. Those in the hydroponics.

Had Orange King and a yellow variety (whose name escapes me at the moment) grown hydroponically. Turned out well. Sometimes I am not too sure the expensive hybrid seeds are worth the money.


Disclaimer: All photographs uploaded here were taken for my own use. You do not see any weeds. It is you imagination.

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 Spicy:

Anaheim  (tops my list  .....a must have) 

Cayenne

Jalapeno

Sweet:

Yummy (orange )

Chinese Giant ( red)

Sunbright  Yellow

 


21' X 48' High Tunnel

Knox, NY

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This one doesn’t come with heat mat. Looks like a heating mat is one of most important things to get. 
 

676E70D1-1829-411E-B961-2A5FE7DBD442.jpeg

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2 hours ago, ol hippie said:

This one doesn’t come with heat mat. Looks like a heating mat is one of most important things to get.

Long ago before I upgraded to a heat mat with temp control. I've used a heating pad and even an electric blanket that went on a bed .

:smile_80_anim_gif:

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You can also build a small wood box the size of the tray about 6" high and put a light bulb in it. Start with a 40W bulb. Not a LED!


Disclaimer: All photographs uploaded here were taken for my own use. You do not see any weeds. It is you imagination.

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I, before I got temp controlled heat mats, used some Christmas lights of the small variety. If I remember correctly, it was TBirds suggestion. 

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1 hour ago, DB1 said:

I, before I got temp controlled heat mats, used some Christmas lights of the small variety. If I remember correctly, it was TBirds suggestion. 

Yes it was Tbird. I tried it and it does work, but I had problems keeping those strings of lights working and I bought a pad and thermostat. 

 


Bob Guidry

Retired Fire Fighter

Easleyville, LA

 

 

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