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The Bayou Gardener Family
Boudin

Thanksgiving Hams

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I've been meaning to post up my Thanksgiving hams but it's been so busy I'm just now getting time. 

Wet cured these for 2 weeks in the fridge, then smoked for around 24 hours in the smokehouse the weekend before Thanksgiving, then just warmed up in the oven on Turkey day.

This isn't hard to do at all , but does take some planning ahead and a bit of specialized equipment.  The results are so worth it, though.  I like to do picnics because the big hams just take so long to get done.  Plus if you do two picnics instead of one big ham, you get 2 ham bones for beans... lol

ham brine.jpg

ham finished.jpg

ham smokehouse.jpg

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When you cure them do you add spices and such at that time?

Those look great.


Disclaimer: All photographs uploaded here were taken for my own use. You do not see any weeds. It is you imagination.

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Yep, the basic cure is sugar, salt and pink salt (cure#1)

On top of that, you can add whatever you want for flavoring.  I use some black pepper, garlic powder, onion powder and a little red pepper.

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A guy down the road from me raises hogs. I trade him vegetables for pork. He or his family usually take care of the processing, but I might try that this next spring.

Thank you.


Disclaimer: All photographs uploaded here were taken for my own use. You do not see any weeds. It is you imagination.

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When I was a kid dad sugar cured about 30 hams. He had a salt box built. About 3x3 I'd say and every other day i had to take them down and pound the cure into them then hang them back up. The mix was salt sugar and black pepper. They were skin on and when they hit the table i would keep rind and use it for fishing bait. You can't imagine how many bluegill you could catch on one rind, they are so tough.

Wade

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That's awesome Wade.  That process fascinates me. I can remember my early days of bass fishing, you could buy spinnerbait and jig trailers made from pork skins.

You couldn't wear them out.  Big Sky Gardener, If you want to try it,  the basic cure mix I use is 1/2 cup sea salt, 1c white sugar, 1c brown sugar and 1 TBS cure  per gallon of water.  You can add whatever other flavorings you like.  Hams need to go a min of 2 weeks in the cure and it doesn't hurt to inject some of the curing brine down around the bones and joints to make sure you get full penetration.  This isn't my recipe, got it from somewhere on the web, but I've used it extensively and it's great.  If you can get your hands on some bellies from your neighbor, this same cure makes really good bacon too.

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The rind had plenty of smell and taste left in it. It hit the water and the fish hit it right now. had lots of fun with that!

Wade

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If it oinks, I can get it from him. Heck can get one that I have to chase around if I wanted too. Will try this though. Was contemplating making a small smoke house.

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Disclaimer: All photographs uploaded here were taken for my own use. You do not see any weeds. It is you imagination.

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